Eco-lumn: California Makes Strides Towards a Cruelty-Free Future

At Blush and at FIT, sustainability is a major cause we care about. Eco-lumn (a play on the words eco and column) serves to inform our readers on the ongoing changes and advances within the sustainability movement within our community, and throughout the world.

 

Rabbit with mascara wand
Image from CrueltyFreeKitty.com

 

On October 1st, 2018 governor of California Jerry Brown signed off on a bill that states, “It is unlawful for a manufacturer to import for profit, sell, or offer for sale in this state, any cosmetic, if the cosmetic was developed or manufactured using an animal test that was conducted or contracted by the manufacturer, or any supplier of the manufacturer, on or after January 1, 2020.” 

 

This act came after the efforts of activists all over California who posed the question: is animal testing ethical?

 

The answer is clearly no. According to the Humane Society, common testing on small mammals like mice, bunnies, and guinea pigs include, but are not limited to, “skin and eye irritation tests where chemicals are rubbed onto the shaved skin or dripped into the eyes of restrained rabbits without any pain relief. Repeated force-feeding studies lasting weeks or months to look for signs of general illness or specific health hazards such as cancer or birth defects. Widely condemned “lethal dose” tests, in which animals are forced to swallow large amounts of test chemicals to determine the dose that causes death.” 

 

Blush hopes that California is the first of every state in our country to enforce this law, eventually making it a federal, country-wide law, joining parts of the European Union, India, Israel, Norway, Switzerland, and the rest of the near-40 countries who have made animal testing illegal.

 

This act was pushed and fought for for many years in California. For the past few decades, the state has actively fought for animal rights. Blush hopes that California is the first of every state in our country to enforce this law, eventually making it a federal, country-wide law, joining parts of the European Union, India, Israel, Norway, Switzerland, and the rest of the near-40 countries who have made animal testing illegal.

 

It is 2020; it is no secret that testing cosmetics on animals is inhumane, unnecessary, and even more expensive than alternative testing. Not only are the alternatives cheaper, they also predict human reactions more accurately. In fact, over 50 alternative methods have been developed so far, including the creation of 3D tissue structures produced from human cells.

 

One important distinction to note about the act is that it does not mean that all products sold in California will be cruelty-free. The law focuses on regulating cosmetic products. So brands that produce their products virtually anywhere else (much of cosmetics production is done overseas), can still test on animals and be sold in the state of California. Ahem, Lancome, Mac, Clinique, Estee Lauder, to name a few.

 

Consumers all across the country, especially California now, need to focus on supporting progressive companies.

 

This is why it is so important to understand where your products are being made, and how they’re made. This is an opportunity to boycott companies practicing unethical practices and support companies who are making shifts towards a better future. Vote with your dollar. Consumers all across the country, especially California now, need to focus on supporting progressive companies. 

 

If you feel passionately about ending animal cruelty, we hope that you take a moment and support legislation to end cosmetic testing on animals nationwide.

 

Cruelty-free companies:

  • Aveda
  • Trader Joe’s
  • E.L.F.
  • Wet ‘n Wild
  • Dermalogica
  • Yes To
  • Bath & Bodyworks
  • Dr Bronner’s
  • Milani
  • Too Faced
  • NYX
  • Urban Decay
  • Smashbox
  • Nature’s Gate
  • Pangea Organics
  • The Body Shop
  • Pacifica
  • Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day
  • Physician’s Formula

 

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