Meet the Women Running for President in 2020

There’s no denying that women have made tremendous strides in politics- particularly since the 2016 election. Despite her loss of presidency, Hillary Clinton forged a path for future female presidential candidates by becoming the first female nominee to represent a major political party in the 2016 election. With this, more women than ever before are running for president in the 2020 election. Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Kamala Harris, Senator Amy Klobuchar, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and Representative Tulsi Gabbard, are the women who have announced their run for Democratic nominee. While no women have announced their run for the Republican party yet, we are hopeful that some will within this election. After 230 years of male presidents, it is long overdue for a qualified female to take the reigns of the White House.

So who are these women, and what do they stand for?

Photo by Charlie Neibergall/AP/REX/Shutterstock (10104385a) Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks to local residents during an organizing event in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The nearly half-dozen Democratic senators also seeking their party's 2020 presidential nomination are facing a juggling act, crisscrossing the country while keeping an eye on their constituents and making it to votes in Washington Election 2020 Balancing Act, Cedar Rapids, USA - 10 Feb 2019

Senator Elizabeth Warren is a previous US Senator and assistant to Barack Obama. Her predominant position is to make sure that the economy favors people at all levels of income. With a humble beginning in which her mother single-handedly kept her family out of poverty, Warren’s fight for the middle class is inspiring. Other topics she feels strongly about are abolishing ICE and creating the “Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which enforces rules for financial institutions, and for her progressive stances issues like student loan reform and corporate capitalism”.

 

Kamala Harris Giving a Speech

Senator Kamala Harris is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee and AttorneyGeneral of California. Vying for the Democrat vote, she is a supporter of universal, governmental run healthcare, tax credits for individuals under a certain income level, and vows to enact the “‘College for All Act’ proposed by Senator Bernie Sanders”. Her extensive background in law and politics deem her an extremely powerful candidate for the Democratic nomination.

 

Amy Klobuchar giving a speech smiling

Senator Amy Klobuchar is no stranger to paving the way for women, as she “became the first woman elected to represent Minnesota in the U.S. Senate” in 2006. Unlike the majority of the Democratic party, she is “not for free four-year college at all.” She does, however, advocate for improving the Affordable Healthcare Act, and vows to re-enter the United States into the Paris climate agreement if she is elected. While Klobuchar has previously had a high turnover rate of staff, her realistic mindset and determination to get things done can push her forward as a successful nominee and potential president.

 

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand giving a speech

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand was a member of both the House of Representatives and the US Senate. Her platform will include issues like The Family Act, rewarding companies that abstain from outsourcing production, and Postal Banking, a legislation that would “require U.S. Post Offices to offer basic financial services, like checking accounts.”  She does have a history of changing her views, however, as she previously opposed gun control and took a stance against illegal immigration. These dramatic shifts in interest may make it harder for her to compete against her fellow Democratic opponents.

 

Representative Tusli Gabbard giving a speach

Representative Tulsi Gabbard not only “became the youngest woman ever elected in the state, when she won a Hawaii House seat at age 21,” she also broke boundaries as the first Samoan-American and first Hindu to be elected to Congress. Unlike the large mass of candidates with exclusive backgrounds of law or politics, Gabbard served in the Army National Guard and even “left Hawaii’s House in order to serve in Iraq.” Issues she considers key to her platform include the ceasing of money spent on regime-change wars, reforming the way the US handles climate change, and providing universal health care. Tulsi’s firsthand war exposure may make up for her lack of congressional experience and provide her with a unique platform.

Every one of the women in the 2020 election race thus far is extremely qualified and not afraid to put up a fight. Regardless of the outcome, this election is already breaking boundaries and making history because of these resolute and powerful women.

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